A sandstone coat of arms with deep relief

sandstone coat of arms by sculptor Koen van Velzen

Weapon Stone

A Bentheimer sandstone coat of arms. Dimensions of relief 40 x 50 x 18 cms, of which the relief member 10 cm deep cut. Clearly shows that this stone is a natural product, as evidenced by the light brown spores of an iron deposit. This can otherwise not harm the conservation of stone. These coats of stone is placed on the inside of a solid with ogee wall garden.

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Why else does a sculptor…

The difference between a spatial relief by a sculptor and a superficial processing (as a stonemason works) is not always immediately clear to every customer. A relief with considerable depth differences gives a vivid, vivid picture. It is also more labor intensive than just notching lines in the stone. This can mean that potential customers are deterred by the higher cost of the work by the sculptor.

stonemason family crest Belgian bluestone / freestone

Ably carved in Belgian stone by a stonecutter. The depth of this performance is a few millimeters.

sandstone coat of arms

A sculptor works much more spacious. The depth of this relief is about 10 centimeters tall.

Yet I also get customers who are not satisfied with a simple sandblasted, lasered or even performed two-dimensional image in stone by an expert. So occasionally I get such a nice job for a weapon such as this stone. These are my favorite commands!

More about family arms on my blog

To read all messages about family arms on this blog, click on this link ↑.

Beeldhouwerijblog.nl is the blog of Koen van Velzen, sculptor in stone and bronze. Look up my website as well: beeldhouwerijvanvelzen.nl

A faun with loss of face, for a castle

Loss of face

repairs on a fractured sandstone faun

The broken pieces are glued back together and the first mortar is applied

(Bicentenary post on this blog!)

From the garden of Singraven Estate in Denekamp, the Netherlands I received a faun in my studio this week. It was a cheerful fellow with a flute on his belly. Only he had lost the face; apparently something had fallen on top of it, for the whole right side of his face was missing. What was left of it was lying beside him on the pallet, neatly packed in a container.

What to do? I was asked that he should be restored to its original state as much as possible. I had been given a new block of sandstone.

Weather-beaten

But actually this stone is just at the end of its lifetime. It would be best if a copy were made in new stone, and that the old one would be put somewhere indoors where it can survive for centuries. For as a result of how it's presently situated, it's strongly in decline now. The Faun had a deep fissure along the layers of the stone (the deposition direction of the stone) on the backside of his head, and other cracks are beginning to form, and the surface of the stone loses its sharpness and becomes more granular. As always it is a matter of balance between cost, value, historical considerations and emotional value.

Restored Faun

Sandstone Faun with restored face

The same Faun after repairs

In this case I was asked to repair the faun. I glued the pieces back again and remodeled the face with restoration mortar. To imitate the skin of the rest of the stone, I didn't make the features and surface of the repairs too sharp, so that it blends seamlessly into the rest. The tear in the back of his head was carefully opened and filled with a thin liquid mortar for natural stone. After that, the surface of this tear was also remodeled with restoration mortar. Finally the sculpture was cleaned and the repairs were colour-matched.

This was not my first faun for a castle; earlier I restored a complete garden bench with dancing fauns for castle Twickel.

Garden bench with fauns or satyrs as theme, with lead relief and new sandstone elements

a restored garden bench with faun- or satyr theme for Castle Twickel

Beeldhouwerijblog.nl is the blog of Koen van Velzen, sculptor in stone and bronze. Look up my website as well: beeldhouwerijvanvelzen.nl

House Sign Blue Tram Street Haarlem finished!

to the first post about this House Sign↑

Gevelsteen Blue Tramstraat polychromedRómulo Döderlein Win painting the gable stone of the Blue Tram street

The House Sign in Udelfanger sandstone for the Blue Tram Street about which I reported on last time is finished. A little summary: the picture was designed and drawn by cartoonist Toon van Driel, after an initiative by the Foundation for House Signs Association Haerlem. It is one of a series of ten different House Signs by ten artists and ten sculptors. …Read the whole article…

An interesting gable stone

A plaque in the making for the Blue Tram street in Haarlem

Last week I started on a very interesting challenge: the carving of a new gable stone relief. The project deserves some explanation, because it includes a lot more than just this one relief. …Read the whole article…

Four grotesques in Amsterdam-1

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Reconstructing and copying

Four grotesques in Amsterdam, lion's head 1, weather-beatenFor a building in Amsterdam, I am currently carving four grotesques: ferocious sandstone heads. All four are severely damaged, which was the reason for choosing to replace them. …Read the whole article…

Cinema Royal (with update)

facade Royal Cinema 1935right hand curl-oldArt Deco

In the days that life was still good and film titles still brilliant , in the Hinthamer street in Den Bosch there was a cinema: Cinema Royal. On a photograph from approximately 1935 we see Claudette Colbert and Clark Gable star in the poster of the movie 'It Happened One Night'. On a recent photograph, they are replaced by the neon letters of Zeeman stores. Apparently the cinema itself was an adaptation; the Art Deco facade still contains a few ornaments from an earlier date. …Read the whole article…

A coat-of-arms in sandstone

A coat of arms stone with family crest in Bentheimer sandstone. The weapon contains three rings, a bar and a three-flowered thistle

For a client I carved a coat-of-arms from a piece of Bentheimer sandstone of 40 x 50 x 12 cms. The weapon contains three rings, a bar and a three-flowered thistle. In the picture, it seems as if the shield is slightly larger than the underlying stone, but that is a slight camera distortion; they both are exactly the same size. …Read the whole article…