A faun with loss of face, for a castle

Loss of face

repairs on a fractured sandstone faun

The broken pieces are glued back together and the first mortar is applied

(Bicentenary post on this blog!)

From the garden of Singraven Estate in Denekamp, the Netherlands I received a faun in my studio this week. It was a cheerful fellow with a flute on his belly. Only he had lost the face; apparently something had fallen on top of it, for the whole right side of his face was missing. What was left of it was lying beside him on the pallet, neatly packed in a container.

What to do? I was asked that he should be restored to its original state as much as possible. I had been given a new block of sandstone.

Weather-beaten

But actually this stone is just at the end of its lifetime. It would be best if a copy were made in new stone, and that the old one would be put somewhere indoors where it can survive for centuries. For as a result of how it's presently situated, it's strongly in decline now. The Faun had a deep fissure along the layers of the stone (the deposition direction of the stone) on the backside of his head, and other cracks are beginning to form, and the surface of the stone loses its sharpness and becomes more granular. As always it is a matter of balance between cost, value, historical considerations and emotional value.

Restored Faun

Sandstone Faun with restored face

The same Faun after repairs

In this case I was asked to repair the faun. I glued the pieces back again and remodeled the face with restoration mortar. To imitate the skin of the rest of the stone, I didn't make the features and surface of the repairs too sharp, so that it blends seamlessly into the rest. The tear in the back of his head was carefully opened and filled with a thin liquid mortar for natural stone. After that, the surface of this tear was also remodeled with restoration mortar. Finally the sculpture was cleaned and the repairs were colour-matched.

This was not my first faun for a castle; earlier I restored a complete garden bench with dancing fauns for castle Twickel.

Garden bench with fauns or satyrs as theme, with lead relief and new sandstone elements

a restored garden bench with faun- or satyr theme for Castle Twickel

Beeldhouwerijblog.nl is the blog of Koen van Velzen, sculptor in stone and bronze. Look up my website as well: beeldhouwerijvanvelzen.nl

Installing: A garden bench for Castle Twickel

During dead quiet weather, a very thick branch of a tree fell down.

During dead quiet weather, a very thick branch of a tree fell down.

During dead quiet weather, a very thick branch of a tree fell down.

The concrete backrest with lead relief and the seat were the most damaged parts.

← to the first post about this project

Today, it was a hot sunny day. With a little power shovel machine and lifting straps we lifted the components of the garden bench and assembled them on site. …Read the whole article…

A puzzle in sandstone

The seat of the bench is ready

The seat of the bench is ready

← to the first post about this project

The next step in the restoration of the garden bench for Twickel Castle is reached: all parts are now ready and now everything must be fitted together. On the left the new sandstone seat is ready. Now the backrest must be fitted. But before that is possible, the backrest itself must be ready. Today I picked up the lead relief. …Read the whole article…

A faun's garden bench for Twickel Castle

garden bench Twickel

The bench, before the fateful blow

← to the first post about this project

As I reported earlier I am currently restoring a garden bench for Twickel Castle with new sandstone components. First, I carved the legs, and now the other parts are being made. It's a somewhat strange bench, …Read the whole article…

Sandstone Sphinxes… or are they Satyrs?

weathered limestone garden ornaments and garlands with sphinxesA thick branch of an oak tree in a big crash wreaked havoc on a garden bench at Castle Twickel. Multiple parts of the bench were broken or damaged, and thus this monumental piece of garden furniture was in great need of a thorough restoration. …Read the whole article…