A monkey in a wig (flying buttress figurine)

flying buttress figurine Monkey, Copying from tuffstone into Muschelkalk

copying the Monkey

The old Monkey from tuffstone

One of the nicest flying buttress figurines from the series 'Noah's Ark’ by Theo van Reijn was now ready to be copied: a Monkey. The creature has an endearing belly, skinny legs and a Big Smile on its snout. And a wig.

That my sawing machine after all of the welding- and tinkering can now cut so accurately is also clearly visible in the pre-cut block. It saves quite a bit of work.

Thrift shop

In the pre-cut block of stone, the shapes of the Monkey are already easily identified

The old figurines from St. Eusebius's Church are all sold for charity, by which at least a portion of the cost will be covered. Such a restoration does of course not come cheap, and this time 96 flying buttress figurines alone will have to be made. Not to mention the hundreds of other new parts for the tower and the church.

This Monkey was immediately already tremendously popular at the auction, and I think his roguish smile is to blame for that.

Unfortunately, the pictures in this article are not so clear, because it was bad weather with very flat light when I finished the figurine.

But perhaps it is not a cheerful smile at all, but rather a wan face from abdominal pain!

The Monkey Blues?

The original statue was made around the years 1953. In those days, there were many deer parks and zoos with a monkey cage, where you could feed the monkeys yourself. Especially on Sundays whole families of people would buy a bag of peanuts, to throw the 'monkey nuts’ towards the primates, sitting a bit glum behind wire mesh on a bare rock. It may be clear that the monkeys did not always get a balanced diet, and would have had to make do with the peanuts that sometimes were thrown with paper bag and all. On other days they would no doubt have gotten better food. I myself have, though that was 15 years later, vivid memories of the deer park, with ominous signs saying that plastic bags were not good for the deer. "If you give the animals plastic, it's certain that soon none of them will survive.’ Perhaps that's how our monkey got his bulging edema belly?

Beeldhouwerijblog.nl is the blog of Koen van Velzen, sculptor in stone and bronze. Look up my website as well: beeldhouwerijvanvelzen.nl

A Razorbill without a head (flying buttress figurine)

Presawing in the snow

Van Velzen sculptor overlooks snowy fields this winterThe next flying buttress figurine for St. Eusebius's Church in Arnhem is ready. I've been busy presawing all the blocks that I had lying around for flying buttress 4 and 5 (read here more), before maybe a real frost period got in the way. Because my saw sits outside, I cannot use it during frost, because then …Read the whole article…

Noah fleeing the rising waters (flying buttress figurine)

Old tuff flying buttress figurine. Noah fleeing the water that is rising up around the arkIn the nearly endless series of flying buttress figurines for St. Eusebius's Church in Arnhem, I again arrived at carving one of the topmost pieces, on which always Noah's Ark is depicted. On this one, this time the ark is shown with swirling waves around it, and Noah climbed into the boat before everything …Read the whole article…

Flying buttress: dog, lion, naked woman, fat man and bird

Sorry, proper translation later this week! These past few weeks I've continued carving for flying buttress 6 and 7 of St. Eusebius's Church in Arnhem.

A short video from the church as the crow flies, with the flying buttresses. As a bonus, a short performance by my colleague Stide Fox copying a corbel.

Flying buttress 6 and 7

flying buttress figurines from flying buttress no. 6 and 7 of St. Eusebius's Church in Arnhem

A photograph that I was sent by Slotboom Stonemasons. The Sad Badger in the foreground was carved by Stide.

It was a motley collection I received at my yard: the Noah and his ark I described earlier, a dog, a naked lady with big feet and a broken neck plus a bird, a very happy lion with his paw in a strange position, a fat man drinking from a large pot, and a bird which we suspected could be a Capercaillie. …Read the whole article…

An interesting gable stone

A plaque in the making for the Blue Tram street in Haarlem

Last week I started on a very interesting challenge: the carving of a new gable stone relief. The project deserves some explanation, because it includes a lot more than just this one relief. …Read the whole article…

Noah and his ark: from tuff to limestone

…to the first post about this project↑

Noah new in MuschelkalkAfter the previous series of flying buttress statues for the Eusebius Church in Arnhem (read here more) it has been quiet at my studio for a long time -with regards to the work on the Eusebius church at least. Funding had been allocated for its restoration, but before it's finally on the bank account of the church, apparently a lot of water first needs to pass under the bridge. But now that all suffering is over with, I can speed along with the work on a series of flying buttresses on the north side of the church. …Read the whole article…

Noah's Ark, up in the air

flying buttress figurines with theme Noah's Ark-1

flying buttress figurines with theme Noah's Ark-new blocks ofMuschelkalk limestone

new blocks of Muschelkalk limestone

Yesterday I received a new batch of stone again: seven new blocks of Muschelkalk limestone and seven old flying buttress statuettes from St. Eusebius's Church in Arnhem (the Netherlands). This series has Noah's Ark as its theme. …Read the whole article…

Four grotesques in Amsterdam-1

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Reconstructing and copying

Four grotesques in Amsterdam, lion's head 1, weather-beatenFor a building in Amsterdam, I am currently carving four grotesques: ferocious sandstone heads. All four are severely damaged, which was the reason for choosing to replace them. …Read the whole article…

Some odd jobs

Radio silence?

Dismantling  the bronze sculpture by Inka Klinckhard (various jobs)

a sculpture by sculptress Inka Klinckhard disassembly

It was very quiet on my blog for a while, but I've still been busy doing some odd jobs. After the placement of two Hercules statues in Barneveld I disassembled and reinstalled another bronze sculpture quite nearby, in Museum Nairac. …Read the whole article…

A new belly for the plinth of Hercules (videos)

A sad history

For centuries the sandstone statue of Hercules stood on its stone base in the Estate Schaffelaar Barneveld. Until sometime in the seventies a group of young people entered the Schaffelaar Wood and smashed it to pieces. In grief, the statue was then buried in the garden. Around the turn of the century, the picture was dug up again and restored somewhat. On the pedestal, meanwhile, …Read the whole article…