Side crockets: Gothic ornaments for the Utrecht Cathedral

Reconstruction of gothic ornaments

weathered old crockets in Ettringer tuff at the cathedral in Utrecht

weathered old crocket in Ettringer tuffstone

The Cathedral in Utrecht is partly covered in scaffolding at the moment. Specifically a large part of its stonework is being overhauled, and part of this project are 16 large tuffstone crockets, or Gothic leaf shapes adorning the frames of the lancet windows. After several centuries of copying there was not much left of their original shape. That was reason enough …Read the whole article…

Crockets and finials for Aachen Cathedral

Two new finials for the Aachen Cathedral in Irish bluestone

For Aachen Cathedral some pinnacles had to be replaced. The old ones were worn and had cracked because of rusting iron and because the layering of the stone was not properly applied. The deposition direction of the stone should preferably be processed horizontal, otherwise there is a risk that a long vertical slice breaks off. In this case, they applied it vertically.

The material for these pinnacles is Irish bluestone. It is …Read the whole article…

A sandstone coat of arms with deep relief

sandstone coat of arms by sculptor Koen van Velzen

Stone crest

A Bentheimer sandstone coat of arms. Dimensions of the relief 40 x 50 x 18 cms, of which the relief part is carved 10 cms deep. Clearly can be seen that this stone is a natural product, as evidenced by the light brown traces of an iron deposit. This does otherwise not harm the preservation of the stone. This coats of arms relief stone is placed on the inside of a solid garden wall with cappings. …Read the whole article…

Pan in porphyry 2: starting with rough carving (video)

Pan in porphyry. The precutand not yet carved piece of stone It is very busy at present, and then it sometimes happens that there is a hitch. After first having a deep cut on my thumb keep me two weeks at home, I am now at home with an tennis elbow that keeps me lying low for a while. Not because of all the sculpting however, neither of those. But that gave me the opportunity to make the video below about the first caving of the sculpture of Pan in porphyry.

Pan will have to wait a little longer anyway, for a coat of arms and seven pinnacles and finials in Irish bluestone for Aachen Cathedral wil have to go first… more on that later.

Beeldhouwerijblog.nl is the blog of Koen van Velzen, sculptor in stone and bronze. Look up my website as well: beeldhouwerijvanvelzen.nl

A visit to the scaffolding of St. Eusebius's Church: Corbels and 14 flying buttress figurines.

A visit to the scaffolding of St. Eusebius's Church

scaffolding visit Eusebius Church with flying buttress figurines

flying buttress no. 6

Last Thursday I visited the Eusebius Church in Arnhem. I had heard that two of the four flying buttresses were installed. For this church I had carved into new limestone 31 copies of the old flying buttress figurines and my colleague Stide also four. Stide has also replaced many larger and smaller corbels and is currently mainly engaged in carving stone masks. …Read the whole article…

Pan in Red Porphyry (1) (video)

block of porphyry for plaster image of Panwooden frame for plaster model. for Pan sculpture in porphyry

Resumed

I finally continued with my plaster statue of Pan (read here more about it). After much doubt about a beautiful red block of granite it ultimately became a piece of Chinese Porphyry. It is not too expensive, it's easier to carve and looks stunning.

I thought I could take the opportunity to …Read the whole article…

The whole zoo in his boat (flying buttress figurine)

Coarse-grained zoo

A whole zoo in a boat. The old tuffstone flying buttress figurine

This week I had an Ark on my hands again. This is the last flying buttress figurine that was designed by Theo van Reijn and probably carved by Eduard van Kuilenburg, in 1953 or ’54. But it's weathered down very much. When it was in my yard, I had to take a good look. I knew it was supposed to be an ark, but I couldn't determine which animals were in it. I thought …Read the whole article…

A faun with loss of face, for a castle

Loss of face

repairs on a fractured sandstone faun

The broken pieces are glued back together and the first mortar is applied

(Bicentenary post on this blog!)

From the garden of Singraven Estate in Denekamp, the Netherlands I received a faun in my studio this week. It was a cheerful fellow with a flute on his belly. Only he had lost the face; apparently something had fallen on top of it, for the whole right side of his face was missing. What was left of it …Read the whole article…

A monkey in a wig (flying buttress figurine)

flying buttress figurine Monkey, Copying from tuffstone into Muschelkalk

copying the Monkey

The old Monkey from tuffstone

One of the nicest flying buttress figurines from the series 'Noah's Ark’ by Theo van Reijn was now ready to be copied: a Monkey. The creature has an endearing belly, skinny legs and a Big Smile on its snout. And a wig.

That my sawing machine after all of the welding- and tinkering can now cut so accurately is also clearly visible in the pre-cut block. It saves quite a bit …Read the whole article…

A Bear with a honeypot (flying buttress figurine)

The bear that didn't look like a bear

flying buttress statuette of bear with honeypot - old original tuff

flying buttress statuette bear with honey -new copy in muschelkalk limestone

And then the bear came with its long snout and blew out… no, he ate all the honey. This 'bear’ was the next flying buttress figurine for St. Eusebius's Church in Arnhem which was to be copied into new stone. Only you have to look very good …Read the whole article…