Finials and side crockets, for Eusebius and Dom Church

finials in Muschelkalk for St. Eusebius's ChurchFinials for St. Eusebius's Church

We are working on the completion of three projects: the first half of St. Eusebius's Church in Arnhem (the Netherlands) is almost finished, the last pieces of St. John's Cathedral are completed, and the last crockets for the South Chapel of the Utrecht cathedral are packed and ready for shipping as well. The finials in the above picture are destined for the south side of St. Eusebius's Church. These are fairly simple crockets in French Massangis-limestone, with a post-war era design, but they will contour well with their clean lines. There are only a few of those, and it's indent work: damaged finials and crockets are cut out from the surrounding stone and a new one is inserted at that spot. Tuesday 19 February, I was on the scaffolding at the church to carve another few of these crockets on site. Always fun, such a visit to the scaffolds.

My own pieces were not yet inserted into the church walls, on the corbel of "The Night’ that I carved recently, but it was still completely enclosed between the scaffolding planks. Stides heads in Muschelkalk, however, were clearly visible, a joy for the eye.

Jelle and I started the morning there with measuring the next batch of 7 flying buttress figurines. Unfortunately many of them were seriously damaged. I hope they do not need too much work before they can serve as a model for their copies!

Tuffstone side crockets for the Utrecht cathedral

old side crockets ready for transport- a beaten-up collection

The last side crockets for the Utrecht Cathedral are now ready for transport as well here. It was a fun project: 29 side crockets in tuffstone for the South Chapel, on the side of the inner courtyard, the Pandhof. We divided this work between the three of us, Stide and I carved about 6 each, and Serge made the rest.

With my chainsaw I separated the old side crockets from their heavy background parts, so they can be put into storage. But I must say that these old blocks will quickly erode once they're on pallets at ground level. Apparently they can certainly get soaked atop the church, but they'll also dry up again very fast. Here on the ground they'll stay wet for much longer and the old pieces also suffer a lot more from frost.

Scaffolding visit on Valentine's Day

We're hoping to carve a lot more for this church, sometime in the future. So we've recently already been back again to see the first blocks in place, and on Valentine's Day we were able to look down on a boisterous Utrecht in bright sunshine. The terraces were full due to the unprecedented warm February sunshine, and with an elated feeling we were looking out over Utrecht and the Domtoren across the street. So, bring on that church!

Beeldhouwerijblog.nl is the blog of Koen van Velzen, sculptor in stone and bronze. Look up my website as well: beeldhouwerijvanvelzen.nl

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2 responses to “Finials and side crockets, for Eusebius and Dom Church

  1. Anonymous wrote:

    Thanks for your interesting posts…Read them with pleasure…What do you do with the old finials (or fragments) the Eusebiuskerk…Would like to have a souvenir…Is there a possibility…
    Best regards
    R. van Maanen

    • Everything goes back to the Eusebiuskerk… and since then they do it in sales, to partially finance the restoration. On the website you can Eusebius here Read more about the sale of air arc images, but other parts are also for sale. Other churches, I do not know; all usable parts of old Utrecht Dom include continued return to archive. Personally, I have nothing to offer and that I should not, it is namely not mine!

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