A Cape Buffalo and a Sea Lion (flying buttress statuettes)

flying buttress statuette for the Eusebius Church in Arnhem: The copy of the Cape Buffalo

The copy of the Cape Buffalo

flying buttress statuette from the Eusebius Church in Arnhem: The original statue of the Cape Buffalo

The tuffstone original of the Cape Buffalo

Backwards

In recent weeks I have been working on a Cape buffalo and a Sea Lion. These two flying buttress figurines for the Eusebius Church in Arnhem had both gotten a new head during earlier restorations . Something funny was going on with the lion seal, though: its head was backwards! Apparently, the sculptor had traced the contours of the break on a new piece of stone, and then carved the head, only to find out during the final fit that only in this position it would match because he had put the template on the wrong way. It took a lot of work to transfer the position of the head a little more plausible into new stone.

Weathering patina

saw machine with the original Cape Buffalo at the left and new  stone to the right.

Presawing the Buffalo. I added some extra plastiline clay to its snout and horns, so I can shape the head.

It was different with the Cape Buffalo: it's an endearing sculpture, and by the position of the feet and the head it's an expressive little thing as well. Now the old tuffstone material gained a certain patina over the years, causing it to stand out well. The new Muschelkalk limestone is sometimes less clearly defined, especially with the dim light under my roof. But this too will over time improve by trapping dirt and washing out the brown layers.

Stripes

This Muschelkalk is a very diverse sort of stone: one block can contain the whole spectrum of hard and soft layers . As a result, a block may turn out soft at the top and rock hard at the bottom. The sea lion had a brown belt around its waist. But after years it will no longer be visible, because all the brown has washed away and the white stone remains, with a porous but strong surface.

Besides, the old sea lion also had a belt around his neck, where the new piece was glued to the old body.

flying buttress statuette for the Eusebius Church in Arnhem: The copy of the Sea Lion

The copy of the Sea Lion

flying buttress statuette from the Eusebius Church in Arnhem: original tufa sculpture of the Sea Lion

original tufa sculpture of the Sea Lion

Read here all posts about the flying buttress figurines for St. Eusebius's Church in Arnhem →

Beeldhouwerijblog.nl is the blog of Koen van Velzen, sculptor in stone and bronze. Look up my website as well: beeldhouwerijvanvelzen.nl

Flying buttress figurine: Elephant with trunk horn

Original flying buttress statuette elephant, copying into new Muschelkalk limestonepraying man and elephant in new limestoneI am currently copying a whole range of flying buttress figurines for St. Eusebius's Church in Arnhem. Read here↑ everything about this project.

This series of flying buttress figurines were designed in the years 1953/54 by Theo van Reijn around the theme of the Great Flood’ or Noahs Ark, and were virtually all carved by Eduard van Kuilenburg. As was this little elephant.

photo of the four flying buttresses designed by Theo van Reijn

The four flying buttresses designed by Theo van Reijn in their original state. In the foreground Bear with honeypot, Monkey, Noah-caller, Desperate Man, Ark under construction.

Beeldhouwerijblog.nl is the blog of Koen van Velzen, sculptor in stone and bronze. Look up my website as well: beeldhouwerijvanvelzen.nl

Llittle praying man (flying buttress figurine for Eusebius Church)

copy of praying man in Muschelkalk limestone copy of praying man in Muschelkalk limestone

Llittle praying man

I'm already quite busy again carving flying buttress 5 from St. Eusebius's Church in Arnhem (the Netherlands). This series consists of a Razorbill, a elephant, a Sea lion, a Buffalo, a Squirrel, a Praying man, and for the third time the Ark. From the description of the figurines by the church: …Read the whole article…

A party for ten gable stone reliefs

to the first post about this House Sign↑

Koen van Velzen at the unveiling of the plaque from the Blue Tram street. Ten house signs after designs by cartoonistsBlue, blue, sky-blue

It was a completely blue party, last Thursday in the Blue Tram Street in New Remittance District in Haarlem. I went there, dressed up in my best moody blues, along with my good colleague Serge van Druten, who had also carved two of the ten stones. There was a tiny but excellent band, some blue trim and blue drinks and balloons. It was very unfortunate that Toon van Driel, who designed the relief of the Blue Tram street as a cartoon, was unable to come because of an illness. I would have like to talk to him. …Read the whole article…

An Owl that snapped (flying buttress figurine)

Copying the flying buttress figurine of the Owl

Material defects

This Owl, another flying buttress figurine carved for St. Eusebius' church in Arnhem, resisted the copying quite a bit. Not that it's such a difficult figurine, it is simple enough. But I was almost done and would only just carve the remaining profiles at the bottom, when I discovered that the dark line at the bottom became a crack, and that with each stroke it became a bit clearer. …Read the whole article…

Flying buttres figurine: Kanga and Baby Roo

Copying Kangaroo. Two turntables on two scissor lift tables so I can reach all areas.

Eeyore's tail and Kanga's nose

This kangaroo carved for St. Eusebius' church I copied without too many changes. The remarkable thing was that it had the tail of a donkey! So I finally figured out where Eeyore had left his tail. With Kanga and her baby Roo. …Read the whole article…